36th Annual Black Doll Show - "Paper, Plastic, Ceramics, and Wood" - Department of Cultural Affairs 36th Annual Black Doll Show - "Paper, Plastic, Ceramics, and Wood" - Department of Cultural Affairs

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36th Annual Black Doll Show – “Paper, Plastic, Ceramics, and Wood”

Influenced by African artists who use recycled and repurposed materials, and in an effort to be green and sensitive to our environment, the 36th Annual Black Doll Show asked artists to mine their studios, kitchens, and thrift stores for raw materials, mixing old and new to create contemporary works of art that move beyond traditional doll making.

Artists in this year’s Black Doll Show include Adah Glenn (Afropuff), Amaechina Doreen, Audrey Chan, Barbara Flemings, Beverly Collins, D. Castro, Dolores Johnson, Ingrid Elburg, Judy Ragagli, Karl Jean-Guerly Petion, Kimberly J. Wilfong Sigman, Lavialle Campbell, Marita Dingus, Mark Steven Greenfield, Roz Brown, Sandra Zebi, Stephanie Moore, Suesan Stovall, Sybil McMiller, Teresa Tolliver, Timothy Washington, Timothy Bellavia, and more.

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December 10, 2016 – February 18, 2017
Gallery Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, Noon to 5 p.m.
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Location

William Grant Still Arts Center
2620 S. West View Street
Los Angeles, CA 90016 United States
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Phone:
323-734-1165
Website:
https://wgsac.wordpress.com

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